How Do I Wash My Twat?

By Autumn Morris

Let me tell you, learning how to take care of my vajayjay has been a struggle for me. It seemed like everything I used to wash or deodorize my no-no square with just irritated it even more. I was always too afraid to ask what I should wash with, how to stop the irritation, how to remove hair without razor bumps, and how to balance my pH. I would use harsh perfumes, sprays, body washes, and scrubs attempting to make my crotch smell like a flower garden.

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News flash: no person’s genitals were made to smell like flowers and be perfectly shaven. Don’t punish your skin with perfumes that can upset your body’s balance. The most important thing to keep in mind when expanding your knowledge on intimate hygiene is: intimate hygiene should be utilized to maintain balance in your body. Your main concern is your comfort level and your pH. Everything else is optional.

Let’s start by talking about pH. A balanced pH means less odor and irritation. A pH imbalance is typically a contributing factor to fungal and bacterial infections.  A healthy pH range for the vagina is between 3.8 and 4.5. Luckily, the vagina is a self-cleaning organ, so not much work is required to keep this pH balance at bay. This means all of your scented body washes and sprays are doing nothing but inhibiting your vagina’s health. Other disruptions of the pH can occur such as the ending of your period, a new sex partner, a new body soap, or anything else that could startle your natural vaginal ecosystem. You can get away with just using water to clean your vulva, but I understand the desire to want to feel like you are getting a deeper clean. If you do use a feminine wash make sure it’s pH falls within the healthy range. If the pH level is not listed, test it. I ordered pH testing strips online and dipped a strip in each of my intimate washes to see how acidic or basic they were. I found that a lot of feminine washes that advertise pH balance actually have a pH level that is MORE acidic than the vagina itself.

As mentioned prior, your vagina is good at self-cleaning, so anything other than washing is typically not required. But, if you do choose to use other products for moisture, balance, or odor, pay attention to the ingredients and the pH. After trying any product I could get my hands on, I have found essential oils to be the best and most effective products to enhance your vaginal ecosystem. Coconut oil is great for pH balance and lubrication, lavender oil is great for soothing any irritation or itching, and tea tree oil is a good, natural antifungal. Essential oils can assist you with your vaginal concerns whilst not compromising your pH balance and creating more advanced issues. Deodorant sprays and perfumes will typically throw off your pH, contributing to more odor issues.

Lastly, pubic hair maintenance can be a pain in the rear! Furthermore, razor bumps or ingrown hairs on an already sensitive area is even worse. Hair removal is not mandatory, and if you struggle with bumps and ingrowns like I do, I suggest you don’t. Your intimate area is very sensitive and important. Treating this area with kindness is important. If shaving causes you issues, I suggest waxing or sugaring. Waxing removes the hair for longer without the irritation of the razor. If waxing causes discomfort, I would try trimming. Trimming your pubic hair eliminates the issue of irritated skin, while still decreasing the amount of hair. You can also look into products that help eliminate the bumps or ingrown hairs, but be careful with what you use as it can disrupt the balance. If all else fails, go natural! Pubic hair traps pheromones released by the skin. The smell of these pheromones can induce attraction and sexual awareness from others.

Intimate care and hygiene can be super difficult and time consuming. The marketplace is saturated with products that seem helpful but are really counterproductive. Your intimate area is important and worthy of the time it takes to find the right products and techniques for upkeep. Do some research, find safe products that address your particular concerns, test the pH of your products, and treat your body with care.